Molecular stopwatch
Graduate student Ben Toulson next to a state-of-the-art velocity map imaging instrument he built in the Murray lab, which uses several spectroscopies to probe gas-phase chemistry, as part of UCI’s world-leading atmospheric chemistry.
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Photograph of unique particle flow tube in Finlayson-Pitts laboratory
This custom-designed and built apparatus allows the study of the formation and growth of particles from the reactions of precursor gases under controlled conditions relevant to the atmosphere.  This flow tube has been highlighted on the Scientific American website as one of ten important atmospheric science experiments.  It requires a group effort to clean.
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Open Chemistry is UCI's chemistry curriculum offered free to the world!
Developed as part of UCI’s commitment to fostering learning globally through a collaborative effort of the UCI School of Physical Sciences and UCI OpenCourseWare, UCI OpenChem provides free and open access to chemistry video lectures.  
http://ps.uci.edu/content/openchemistry-lectures
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Visualizing breaking bonds
The Craig Murray group is exploring unconventional mechanisms in the photochemistry of small molecules using state-of-the-art velocity-map-imaging methods.
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Message from Chair James Nowick

Welcome to the UCI Department of Chemistry! My colleagues and I are committed to providing undergraduate and graduate students with world-class education and training while pushing the frontiers of knowledge through cutting-edge research. Our department comprises more than sixty active research groups, with expertise in Analytical, Atmospheric, Inorganic, Organic, Physical, and Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, as well as Chemical Biology, Materials and Nanochemistry, and Chemical Education.

Please join us! Explore our website. Partake of classes. Apply to our graduate program. Pursue employment opportunities. Contact our faculty. 

We are delighted to have been designated a National Historic Chemical Landmark by the American Chemical Society for work on CFCs and the threat to the ozone layer by Professor F. Sherwood Rowland and Mario Molina. A dedication ceremony was held on April 18 at Rowland Hall, and a bronze plaque was installed.